Female Viagra Nearing Approval in U.S.

A panel from the United States government is backing a new, pioneer medication to treat female sexual interest/arousal disorder, which is more commonly known as FSIAD. FSIAD can deeply affect the lifestyles of many women, possibly dissolving relationships and lowering day to day levels of satisfaction. Flibanserin, currently nicknamed the “female Viagra”, works to help pre menopausal women improve their low sexual desire, though the drug will not be hitting the market quite yet, as the final decision falls to the United States Food and Drug Administration.

This is not the first time that Flibanserin has been brought to the FDA for possible approval. Flibanserin has actually been rejected twice before since its first proposal in 2010. However, now that the medication has gathered the attention of field experts, there may be a chance for Flibanserin’s approval, as the FDA often follows the advice of experts. Though the FDA is being urged to approve Flibanserin, the drug will still require warnings against dangerous possible side effects, which include both fatigue and fainting.

In previous double blind testing on more than 5,000 women, where the participants had tried Flibanserin against a placebo, there have been somewhat positive reports on the results. Women noted that they experienced between 0.5 and 1 additional sexually satisfying event per month versus those who had consumed the placebo. While these are definite results, they were viewed as modest at best. Regardless, any positive results can make a considerable difference to the sufferer at a certain point within a clinical problem, and FSIAD is no exception. Additionally, actual reports from subjects indicate that the drug not only is useful for salvaging relationships and relieving tension, but many have even called Flibanserin “life changing.”

The medication’s developer, Sprout Pharmaceuticals, has also been aided by a heavy-hitting women’s rights organization known as Even the Score. The rights group has gone as far as to accuse the FDA of gender biasing against females, citing the continual approval of multiple medications which work to treat erectile dysfunction and sexual disinterest in men without approving an equivalent medication for women.

However, some criticized Flibanserin due to its modest effects, noting that if a drug is financially backed, sufficient lobbyists can sway the FDA to approve medications. In this manner the market may be opened to useless or dangerous drugs. If Flibanserin is eventually approved by the FDA, possible trade names proposed for the new drug are Girosa or Addyi.

UPDATE:

Since the publication of this article, flibanserin has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), August 18th, 2015.


Other articles you may be interested in...