Treatment for Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a very common, chronic skin condition that results in red, patchy, flaky areas of the skin. These areas develop because of the effects on the lifecycle of the skin cells. Normally it takes new cells approximately 1 month to rise to the top or surface of the skin after development. At this point the skin layer it dies and flakes off. When an individual has Psoriasis this entire lifecycle takes approximately 4 to six days which results in a buildup of cells that forms silvery scales and e.g. red patches that can become painful.

Individuals have a variety of ways in which Psoriasis will express itself. For some people it’s just a nuisance while for others it is disabling, especially when it is associated with arthritis. There will probably be periods when the Psoriasis symptoms improve or go into remission which will alternate with flare ups, or times when it becomes worse.

Currently, there is no cure but physicians and researchers have developed treatment protocols, which offers significant relief for the sufferer. There are also self-care measures that can help to improve the symptoms and prolong remission.

Individuals who take care to change their lifestyle and include changes to their daily routine will find improvement in the appearance and feel of the skin damaged by Psoriasis. Taking a daily bath will help to remove the scales and call me inflamed skin. Adding bath oils, Epsom salts or oatmeal and soaking for at least 15 minutes will help the inflammation in the skin. Use lukewarm water and mild soaps that have added oils and fats and avoid hot water which can make the symptoms worse.

Refrain from scrubbing the skin dry and instead blocks from the skin and immediately apply a heavy Wightman-based moisturizer while the skin is still moist. During cold dry weather individuals may need to apply a moisturizer several times a day. To help improve the redness you can also apply in the Wightman-based moisturizer and wrapped with plastic wrap overnight. In the morning remove the covering and wash away the scales with a bath or shower.

Researchers also found that exposing the skin to small amounts of sunlight will significantly improve the lesions, but it’s too much sun can trigger a flare up or worse than an outbreak. Keep a record of when you sunbathe during the day and how long you’re in the sun both to avoid overexposure and to record how well your body reacts to the sun. Protect your skin with sunscreen of at least 15 SPF and paid special attention to your ears, hands and face.

You may want to try and over the counter cortisone cream of less than 1% for a few weeks when your symptoms are especially bad. Individuals who are able to identify their particular triggers and avoid them will also help to decrease flare ups and the severity of the flare ups when they do occur. Some common triggers include injuries to the skin, infection, stress, smoking and intense sun exposure.

Individuals who want to pursue phototherapy without exposure to the sun can also be exposed to wavelengths of altar of violent light under medical supervision by visiting a dermatologist.

Dermatologists and primary care physicians may 1 recommend over-the-counter treatments which include salicylic acid, tar and nonprescription moisturizers and bath solutions. Once these have been tried and no relief is found physicians may prescribe Antralin, Dovonex, Taclonex, Tazorac, or a topical steroids.

Physicians may also choose systemic medications that affect the entire body if the Psoriasis is not confined to a small area. These are usually reserved for patients who have moderate to severe disease and are not responsive to conventional topical medications or UV light treatments. Biologic medications that are developed from living sources include Enbrel, Humira, Raptiva and Remicade. Physicians may also consider Cyclosporine, Methotrexate or Soriatane.

Individuals who choose to not go the route of some of the more strong systemic medications may try acupuncture, herbal medications, meditation and magnets as alternative treatments to treat Psoriasis and hopefully steer clear of medications that may have more significant side effects.

At this time there is that little scientific research on the effects of diets on Psoriasis. However, the national psoriasis foundation has heard a number of claims and theories about the effects of particular foods, diets and dietary supplements. While it is known that it’s vitamin deficiencies in calcium and vitamin D can be triggers for flareups others have also found that by evaluating their diets and removing products that may negatively affect their immune system they can effect a positive change in the way their body reacts to triggers to their Psoriasis.

Because a definitive cause of Psoriasis has not yet been found physicians are on able to recommend a cure. However, current research has also found several different treatment modalities which give individuals significant relief from the pain, discomfort and embarrassment of suffering with Psoriasis.


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