Astagraf XL (Tacrolimus)

Envarsus PR
0.75mg Tablet (Extended-Release)

Prescription required. Can not be split. Product of UK/EU. Shipped from United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Astagraf XL is also marketed internationally under the name Envarsus PR.

Envarsus PR
1mg Tablet (Extended-Release)

Prescription required. Can not be split. Product of UK/EU. Shipped from United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Astagraf XL is also marketed internationally under the name Envarsus PR.

Envarsus PR
4mg Tablet (Extended-Release)

Prescription required. Can not be split. Product of UK/EU. Shipped from United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Astagraf XL is also marketed internationally under the name Envarsus PR.


To comply with Canadian International Pharmacy Association regulations you are permitted to order a 3-month supply or the closest package size available based on your personal prescription. read more


Tacrolimus Information

Tacrolimus Injection (ta kroe' li mus) Prograf® FK 506 Tacrolimus injection should only be given under the supervision of a doctor who is experienced in treating people who have had an organ transplant and in prescribing medications that decrease the activity of the immune system. Tacrolimus injection decreases the activity of your immune system. This may increase the risk that you will get a serious infection. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: sore throat; cough; fever; extreme tiredness; flu-like symptoms; warm, red, or painful skin; or other signs of infection. When your immune system is not working normally, there may be a greater risk that you will develop cancer, especially lymphoma (a type of cancer that begins in the cells of the immune system). The longer you receive tacrolimus injection or other medications that decrease the activity of the immune system, and the higher your doses of these medications, the more this risk may increase. If you experience any of the following symptoms of lymphoma, call your doctor immediately: swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpits, or groin; weight loss; fever; night sweats; excessive tiredness or weakness; cough; trouble breathing; chest pain; or pain, swelling, or fullness in the stomach area. Talk to your doctor about the risks of receiving tacrolimus injection.

Tacrolimus injection is used along with other medications to prevent rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by the transplant recipient's immune system) in people who have received kidney, liver, or heart transplants. Tacrolimus injection should only be used by people who are unable to take tacrolimus by mouth. Tacrolimus injection is in a class of medications called immunosupressants. It works by decreasing the activity of the immune system to prevent it from attacking the transplanted organ.

Tacrolimus injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be injected intravenously (into a vein) by a doctor or nurse in a hospital or medical facility. It is usually given as an ongoing infusion, beginning no sooner than 6 hours after transplant surgery and continuing until tacrolimus can be taken by mouth. A doctor or nurse will watch you closely during the first 30 minutes of your treatment and then will monitor you often so that you can be treated quickly if you have a serious allergic reaction.

Before using tacrolimus ointment, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to tacrolimus ointment, injection, or capsules (Prograf), or any other medications. tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking. Be sure to mention any of the following: antifungals such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), and ketoconazole (Nizoral); calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) and verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); cimetidine (Tagamet); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); and other ointments, creams, or lotions. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. tell your doctor if you have a skin infection and if you have or have ever had kidney disease, Netherton's syndrome (an inherited condition that causes the skin to be red, itchy, and scaly), redness and peeling of most of your skin, any other skin disease, or any type of skin infection, especially chicken pox, shingles (a skin infection in people who have had chicken pox in the past), herpes (cold sores), or eczema herpeticum (viral infection that causes fluid filled blisters to form on the skin of people who have eczema). Also tell your doctor if your eczema rash has turned crusty or blistered or you think your eczema rash is infected. tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using tacrolimus ointment, call your doctor. if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using tacrolimus ointment. ask your doctor about the safe use of alcoholic beverages while you are using tacrolimus ointment. Your skin or face may become flushed or red and feel hot if you drink alcohol during your treatment. avoid exposure to chicken pox, shingles, and other viruses. If you are exposed to one of these viruses while using tacrolimus ointment, call your doctor immediately. you should know that good skin care and moisturizers may help relieve the dry skin caused by eczema. Talk to your doctor about the moisturizers you should use, and always apply them after applying tacrolimus ointment.

Talk to your doctor about eating grapefruit and drinking grapefruit juice while you are taking this medicine.

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply extra ointment to make up for a missed dose.

Tacrolimus injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body diarrhea constipation nausea vomiting heartburn stomach pain loss of appetite difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep dizziness weakness back or joint pain burning, numbness, pain or tingling in the hands or feet Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, or those mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately: hives rash itching difficulty breathing or swallowing decreased urination pain or burning on urination swelling of the arms, hands, feet, ankles or lower legs weight gain unusual bleeding or bruising seizures coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time) Tacrolimus injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are receiving this medication. If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program. It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain tests to check your body's response to tacrolimus. Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription. It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

The content on this page is for informational and educational purposes only and does not constitute professional medical advice. Patients should not use the information presented on this page for diagnosing a health-related issue or disease. Before taking any medication or supplements, patients should always consult a physician or qualified healthcare professional for medical advice or information about whether a drug is safe, appropriate or effective.